Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans:
The Battle That Shaped America's Destiny

When the British fought the young United States during the War of 1812, they knew that taking the mouth of the Mississippi River was the key to crippling their former colony. Capturing the city of New Orleans and stopping trade up the river sounded like a simple task--New Orleans was far away from Washington, out of sight and out of mind for the politicians.

What the British didn't count on was the power of General Andrew Jackson. A formidable military leader with a grudge against the British and a heart for the common man, he rallied the divided inhabitants of New Orleans, bringing together Frenchmen, Native Americans, freed slaves, pirates, and Kentucky woodsmen.

In their now trademark fashion, Kilmeade and Yaeger will trace the development of Jackson's character and bring the reader to the scenes of one of the most pivotal--and surprising--battles in American history.


Praise for Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates

Standing on an earthen dam hastily reinforced by bales of cotton, untrained volunteers, and friendly buccaneers, frontiersman and future President, General Andrew Jackson defeated the world’s most respected army, and confirmed America’s survival.  It is a tale as improbable as it is spellbinding, told with deft touch and insightful clarity.  Brian Kilmeade has done it again.
— General Stanley McChrystal (U.S. Army, Retired), author of Team of Teams
Brian Kilmeade has done it again. Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans is a tour de force, elegantly written and endlessly fascinating. The scholarship is impeccable, the topic immensely important, the story masterfully crafted. This little gem of a book belongs on the bookshelf of every history buff. What a triumph!
— Jay Winik, author of April 1865 and 1944
The Battle of New Orleans changed history—just not exactly in the way anyone figured at the time. From the field of arms on the Gulf Coast of a young United States as 1814 became 1815 rose a new national hero who would come to be seen, by his friends, as a second George Washington or, by his foes, as a dangerous Napoleon. Such was the life and career of Andrew Jackson, and Brian Kilmeade, who has a gift for narrative and an intuitive feel for great stories, has written an exciting account of New Orleans and how that battle changed America down the decades.
— Jon Meacham, author of Thomas Jeffersonr, American Lion, Destiny and Power, and Franklin and Winston
This book is the unique story of an early sliding door moment in our history. Take an “untrained” Frontier patriot general who gathered civilians, privateers and citizen soldiers to defend against the British empire and their most powerful military in the world. The reader gets an inkling of the grit that made America Great.
— Erik Prince, author of Civilian Warriors
Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger’s Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans is a riveting introduction to one of the seminal battles in U.S. History. The War of 1812 folk legend of Old Hickory rides high on his horse again in this engrossing overview for readers of all ages. Highly recommended!
— Douglas Brinkley, Professor of History at Rice University and author of Rightful Heritage
Brian Kilmeade does it again! Andrew Jackson and the Battle of New Orleans is riveting history that reads like a stay-up-all-night thriller. Don’t miss this book!
— Brad Thor, author of Use of Force
A wild, page-turning history of one of America’s most fascinating battles. Come see why Jackson is so alive again.
— Brad Meltzer, bestselling author of The President’s Shadow
Once again Brian Kilmeade has taken a skillful journalistic view of one of U.S. history’s most fascinating newsmakers, Andrew Jackson. Kilmeade’s close up reveals Jackson’s toughness, tenacity and little-known tenderness that lead to an epic event in America’s struggle for lasting independence and sovereignty—the miraculous Battle of New Orleans. Kilmeade shows how the patriotism of Jackson and his generation made America great in the first place. A terrific read.
— Jane Hampton Cook, presidential historian and author of The Burning of the White House